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10% Off Your Order at Wholesale Puzzles Online: Shop at Wholesale Puzzle and get 10% off on your order with the promo code: PARTY10 at checkout. Free shipping on orders over…

10% Off Your Order at Wholesale Puzzles
Online: Shop at Wholesale Puzzle and get 10% off on your order with the promo code: PARTY10 at checkout. Free shipping on orders over $100. Stay connected with us for more offers and updates. (Sep-15-2019)

Just $9 on Clearance Puzzles at Wholesale Puzzles
Online: Shop at Wholesale Puzzle and get clearance puzzles for $9. No coupon code needed. Free shipping on orders over $100. For more offers and updates visit our website. (Sep-15-2019)

Just $11 on Clearance Puzzles at Wholesale Puzzles
Online: Shop at Wholesale Puzzle and get clearance puzzles for $11. No coupon code needed. Free shipping on orders over $100. Stay connected with us for more offers and updates. (Sep-15-2019)


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Save 10% Off on Entire Order
Online: Shop at Wholesale Puzzle and save 10% off on entire order. Use promo code: JIGSAW plus free shipping on orders over $100. Stay connected with us for more offers and updates. (July-14-2019)

 

 


About Wholesale Puzzles


We know nothing is more frustrating than getting nearly finished with your puzzle and then discovering that a piece is missing. Unfortunately, even with our manufacturers’ best efforts, sometimes it still happens. If you find yourself missing a piece, contact the manufacturer listed below unless otherwise noted. Welcome to our Customer Service Center! You can expect excellent customer service from Wholesale Puzzles. Use the menu to the left to find more information from our Customer Service department including refunds, returns, and more. The engraver and cartographer John Spilsbury, of London, is believed to have produced the first jigsaw puzzle around 1760, using a marquetry saw. Early jigsaws, known as dissections, were produced by mounting maps on sheets of hardwood and cutting along national boundaries, creating a puzzle useful for the teaching of geography, Such “dissected maps” were used to teach the children of King George III and Queen Charlotte by royal governess Lady Charlotte Finch. The name “jigsaw” came to be associated with the puzzle around 1880 when fretsaws became the tool of choice for cutting the shapes. Since fretsaws are distinct from jigsaws, the name appears to be a misnomer. Cardboard jigsaw puzzles appeared during the late 1800s, but were slow to replace the wooden jigsaw due to the manufacturer’s belief that cardboard puzzles would be perceived as being of low quality, and the fact that profit margins on wooden jigsaws were larger. Jigsaw puzzles soared in popularity during the Great Depression, as they provided a cheap, long-lasting, recyclable form of entertainment. It was around this time that jigsaws evolved to become more complex and more appealing to adults.[1] They were also given away in product promotions, and used in advertising, with customers completing an image of the product being promoted. Most modern jigsaw puzzles are made out of paperboard since they are easier and cheaper to mass-produce than the original wooden models. An enlarged photographor printed reproduction of a painting or other two-dimensional artwork is glued onto the cardboard before cutting. This board is then fed into a press. The press forces a set of hardened steel blades of the desired shape through the board until it is fully cut. This procedure is similar to making shaped cookies with a cookie cutter. The forces involved, however, are tremendously greater and a typical 1000-piece puzzle requires a press that can generate upwards of 700 tons of force to push the knives of the puzzle die through the board.

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